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I have to admit that the title for this section is not quite accurate, or at least not complete. A better title might be "The Crown Jewels, and a Lot of Things that Aren’t Crown Jewels". Or more succinctly, "Rosenborg’s Basement". But a basement invokes images of a dark, dingy place filled with forgotten stuff, mostly of negligible value, plus maybe a furnace or a water heater. Rosenborg’s basement isn’t really like this – there might be some appliances of this sort hidden somewhere, but we didn’t notice, as we were busy looking at the fabulously valuable stuff the basement is filled with.

I also have to admit that I’m not that clear on what separates the Crown Jewels from the Things that Aren’t, so I won’t attempt to point out Crown Jewels when they appear, as I stand a pretty good chance of being wrong. But I can promise this: Some of the following things are for-real Crown Jewels. First, we’ll start with some things that definitely aren’t Crown Jewels – some of the royal firearms:


Ceremonial Muskets
Ceremonial Muskets
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Set of Colt Revolvers
Set of Colt Revolvers
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Christian IV's Blood-Stained Clothing

"Romans and Africans" Game (1748-56)
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As seen in the upper floors of the castle, the royal family had an affinity for elaborate decorative objects. A preferred material from which to make such objects (and popular throughout Europe, though undoubtedly less so with elephants) was ivory.

Marsyas, Pan and Apollo
Marsyas, Pan and Apollo, Hans Ochs (1624)
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Ivory Objects and Fighting Figures
Ivory Objects and Fighting Figures
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Ivory Creation
Ivory Creation
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The Apotheosis of Frederik IV
The Apotheosis of Frederik IV, Magnus Berg
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Water

Water, Magnus Berg (1708-23)
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Another frequently-used material from which to make valuable decorative objects was fossilized tree resin, otherwise known as amber.

Amber Mirror Frame Etc.
Amber Mirror Frame Etc.
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Amber Chess/Checkers Set
Amber Chess/Checkers Set
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And a king couldn’t drink wine from a jelly glass or Dixie Cup – a kingly vessel such as one of the following was required:

Chalice from Altar Set
Chalice from Altar Set (1632)
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Enameled Chalice
Enameled Chalice (1648)
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Frederik III's Coronation Set

Frederik III's Coronation Set (1653)
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Another type of object of which the royals were fond was an object in which one could store other objects. Here are some of their favorite containers:

Jewelry Box
Jewelry Box
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Bowl with Cameos and Intaglios
Covered Bowl with Cameos and Intaglios
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Crystal Vessels
Crystal Vessels
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Jewelled Box with Birds
Jewelled Box with Birds
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Cup with Cameos and Intaglios
Cup with Cameos and Intaglios (ca. 1635-50)
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Gold Pot with Crown
Gold Pot with Crown
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Box with Enameled Fruit and Flowers
Box with Enameled Fruit and Flowers
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Enameled Boxes
Enameled Boxes
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And of course there was always room in the castle for random stuff.

Jewelry for Horses
Jewelry for Horses (1634)
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The Oldenburg Horn
The Oldenburg Horn (ca. 1465)
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Beaded Coat of Arms
Beaded Coat of Arms
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Prayer Book of Anne Cathrine
Prayer Book of Anne Cathrine
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Relief Medallion of Carl of Hesse
Relief Medallion of Carl of Hesse (1692)
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Large Jewel with Skull, Dice and Cross
Large Jewel with Skull, Dice and Cross
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Some objects display a Danish Coat of Arms. Different members of the royal family have different coats of arms, but there is generally an elephant to be found somewhere in the display. This symbolizes membership in the Order of the Elephant, Denmark’s highest honorary order, reserved for members of the royal family, selected heads of state, or (rarely) commoners of high accomplishment. Sometimes the Coat of Arms is accompanied by woodwoses, mythical "wild men" who are said to live in forests throughout Europe.

Coat of Arms with Woodwoses
Coat of Arms with Woodwoses
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Coat of Arms with Woodwoses
Another Coat of Arms with Woodwoses
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And of course there was quite a bit of jewelry on display. Maybe some of the following are considered Crown Jewels:

Jewelry
Jewelry (16th-17th C.)
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Jewelled Pendants
Jewelled Pendants
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Caroline Mathilde's Watch
Caroline Mathilde's Watch (1767)
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Jewelry of Wives of Christian VI and Christian VII
Jewelry of Wives of Christian VI and Christian VII
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Emerald Set of Sophie Magdalene
Emerald Set of Sophie Magdalene (1723)
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Jewels of Caroline Amalie
Jewels of Caroline Amalie (1840)
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The Royal Amethyst (1671)

The Royal Amethyst (1671)
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At one time Danish monarchs wore or held special royal objects at ceremonial occasions. These objects are collectively known as the royal regalia, and they are not normally worn anymore. They are arranged near or on the casket at a monarch’s funeral, however. The main pieces of the royal regalia are the crown, the scepter, the royal orb and the sword of state. Additional ornamentation was also worn.

Rapier Hilt
Rapier Hilt (Gold, Enamel, Diamonds, 1634)
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Sword Hilt
Sword Hilt
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Regalia of Frederik III
Regalia of Frederik III (1648)
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Scepter of Frederik III
Scepter of Frederik III (1648)
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There are three crowns on display. The oldest is the Crown of Christian IV, first used at Christian IV’s coronation in 1596. It doesn’t look like it could have been very comfortable. It was last used in 1648 at the coronation of Christian IV’s son, Frederik III. In 1671 Frederik had a new crown made for his son, who was to become Christian V, and this crown is appropriately called the Crown of Christian V. There is a similar crown that was used by queens. It was created in 1731 for use by Sophia Magdalen, the queen of Christian VI.

Christian IV's Crown
Christian IV's Crown (1595-96)
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Christian V's Crown
Christian V's Crown (1670-71)
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Emerging from beneath the ground, we blinked and puzzled over what to do with the rest of our last day in Copenhagen. A mental note we had made to ourselves earlier reemerged, and after brief consideration we headed for a bus stop. We were going to Christianshavn and the Our Savior Church.

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